FIVE STEPS YOU MUST NOT MISS IN TREATING CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH

Speech Therapy
FIVE STEPS YOU MUST NOT MISS IN TREATING CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH

FIVE STEPS YOU MUST NOT MISS IN TREATING CHILDHOOD APRAXIA OF SPEECH

I have incorporated the motor programming and linguistic approaches (evidence based) into my practice and have come up with five hierarchical steps that make treating CAS easy, predictable and more successful.

  1. Rapport building

A significant step to gain a child’s trust before introducing any therapy strategies is rapport building, which is extremely important in a speech therapy session. If a child is able to trust his therapist and enjoy the learning process, the targeted skills or sounds can be achieved much faster than otherwise. Using the child’s favourite toys and activities can catalyse building trust and the joy of learning.

  1. Simple Imitation Tasks

In a speech therapy session, as speech language pathologists, we often help children understand the placement of articulators through oral motor imitation. The following steps can help teach imitation progressively. I would recommend that you begin with gross motor imitation because, imitation using larger muscles groups are much easier for children as compared to the teeny-tiny muscles of the mouth. During an oral motor imitation task, ensure to elicit voluntary sound production as it facilitates imitation of sounds and words eventually. 

  1. Single Word Imitation

Start with vowels or a consonant that is already existing or easy to imitate. Combine sounds with images and pictures to make them meaningful units; then, combine single sounds into words by using vowel-consonant combinations. Once the child is able to  start using at least about 50 words, introduce short phrases. 

  1. Sentence Construction

Use the short phrases and expand them into sentences by adding other words to it (preferably one additional word at a time).  Reading practice can be of great help at this juncture as syntax and morphological structures get easily added into the child’s vocabulary. 

  1. Conversation building

The final step is to build conversations. Start with book reading and summarising short stories. Follow this by introducing the child to social communication groups with other children to build advanced and high demand speech tasks. I have used the above strategies in my sessions and found them extremely useful, I encourage you to try them out and let us know!

Read our previous post to understand evidence based practices in treating Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

https://www.dimensionstherapy.org/news/details/18/Evidence-Based-Practices-in-Treating-Childhood-Apraxia-of-Speech

References

  1.   https://www.facebook.com/757481277632566/videos/249369176374821
  2. https://www.asha.org/PRPSpecificTopic.aspx?folderid=8589935338§ion=Treatment#:~:text=Motor programming approaches—use motor,sounds and sequences of sounds.
  3. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Robert_Krout/publication/222122057_A_music_therapy_clinical_case_study_of_a_girl_with_childhood_apraxia_of_speech_Finding_Lily's_voice/links/5aea31380f7e9b837d3c3451/A-music-therapy-clinical-case-study-of-a-girl-with-childhood-apraxia-of-speech-Finding-Lilys-voice.pdf
  4. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Patricia_McCabe/publication/261256095_A_Systematic_Review_of_Treatment_Outcomes_for_Children_With_Childhood_Apraxia_of_Speech/links/5510a96d0cf2ba84483f9ab9.pdf

 

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